LANGUAGE ARTS

English 9 (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

English 9 provides students with the language skills needed to prepare them for college and career readiness and helps students refine the skills necessary for the development of academic literacy. These skills are developed through the active reading of literary and informational texts, academic language development of text-embedded vocabulary, oral language practice, and writing of informational, argumentative, synthetic, and narrative pieces. Students practice critical thinking, comprehension, and application skills through thematic units centered on topics, such as plot and conflict, themes and symbols, argument and persuasion, and drama. This course expands upon proficiencies in the fundamentals of reading and writing with a focus on comprehension and mastery of syntax and grammar.

Honors English 10 (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters.)

English 12 promotes effective writing, critical thinking, and literary analysis. Material includes British literature as well as examining historical and cultural concepts in order to develop and express their own perspectives in spoken and written arguments. Key Concepts: Reading skills & the writing process; literary text analysis & research; short stories, poetry, & drama; British poems, novels, & plays; informative, persuasive, expository, & narrative writing; word choice & tone; grammar & punctuation.

English 10 (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

English 10 provides students with the language skills needed to prepare them for college and career readiness. These skills are developed through the active reading of literary and informational texts, academic language development of text-embedded vocabulary, oral language practice, and writing of informational, argumentative, synthetic, and narrative pieces. Students practice critical thinking, comprehension, and application skills through thematic units centered on topics, such as plot and conflict, themes and symbols, argument and persuasion, and drama. This course expands upon proficiencies in the fundamentals of reading and writing with a focus on comprehension and mastery of syntax, grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in written communication. Students are exposed to a variety of literary texts to construct coherent writing pieces that help to develop their position and perspective on a variety of topics.

Honors English 11 (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters.)

This course is intended for students who are highly skilled and motivated in language arts, including both reading and writing. It is designed to cover areas of literature, writing, and vocabulary development. Students will be exposed to a variety of literary forms as well as various kinds of writing experiences, from reading long-form narratives, essays, primary sources, and poetry. Critical thinking is emphasized, and complex writing assessments, including a research paper, are required. This course builds on the skills developed in the tenth-grade year and includes exercises in vocabulary building, close reading, and literary analysis are designed to engage the student in the learning process and take ownership of their own progress. This course explores literature from many different time periods and geographical areas.

English 11 (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

English 11 builds on student literacy and language arts skills to promote effective writing, critical thinking, and analysis of literature. The course material walks students through American history through literary pieces, including short works of fiction and nonfiction, poems, novels, and plays written by a variety of authors providing varying topics and perspectives. This course expands upon proficiencies in the fundamentals of reading and writing with an emphasis on comprehension and mastery of syntax, grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in written communication, along with word analysis and systematic vocabulary development. Students will write informative, narrative, argumentative, and other expository texts appropriate to audience, task, and purpose, and demonstrate command of the English language. Students will also examine the influence of historical and cultural contexts.

Honors English 12 (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters.)

Honors English 12 aims to broaden and stretch already competent readers and writers to attain higher standards of writing and gain a deeper appreciation of the written and spoken word. The course is designed to give students the opportunity to track the development of literary movements and developments over time, in a variety of forms from non-fiction to short stories. The course is populated with work from predominantly British writers which explore a wide range of themes and styles. The course incorporates the common core standards and promotes college and career readiness. It prepares the students to be active and engaged citizens with the ability to understand complex texts and ideas and to compose valid and supported arguments.

English 12 (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

English 12 builds on student literacy and language arts skills to promote effective writing, critical thinking, and analysis of literature. The course material walks students through British literary pieces, including short works of fiction and nonfiction, poems, novels, and plays written by a variety of authors providing varying topics and perspectives. This course expands upon proficiencies in the fundamentals of reading and writing with an emphasis on comprehension and mastery of syntax, grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in written communication, along with word analysis and systematic vocabulary development. Students will write informative, narrative, argumentative, and other expository texts appropriate to audience, task, and purpose, and demonstrate command of the English language. Students will also examine the influence of historical and cultural contexts.

AP English Language (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

AP English course focuses on an in-depth analysis of all forms of literature and uses said literature as a model and source for developing students own writing skills. The course weaves the four skills of English (reading, writing, listening and speaking) together in each unit by explicitly and implicitly presenting information, practice and production assignments. The course objectives and content are aligned with Common Core Standards but aim to prepare these (honors) students for Advanced Placement English in 10th or 11th grade. The course makes connections between literary genres and how we write and the function and beauty of language.

English Foundations (2 Semesters)

English Foundations aims to familiarize students with the various styles of writing expected of them throughout high school through reading and analyzing selected works and developing their writing skills. Fiction and non-fiction work will be used to create students analysis and critical reading skills and to serve as models for writing assignments.

AP English Literature (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

The AP  English Literature and Composition course are characterized by all those things you wished fervently for last year when you signed up for it: lots of reading from books that will either make your head spin or clog you up with questions such as: “What was that about?” There will be lots of writing; lots of vocabulary; and grammar instruction as the need dictates. 

Honors English 9 (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

This Honors English course focuses on an in-depth analysis of all forms of literature and uses said literature as a model and source for developing students own writing skills. The course weaves the four skills of English (reading, writing, listening and speaking) together in each unit by explicitly and implicitly presenting information, practice and production assignments. The course objectives and content are aligned with Common Core Standards but aim to prepare these (honors) students for Advanced Placement English in 10th or 11th grade. The course makes connections between literary genres and how we write and the function and beauty of language.

MATHEMATICS

Algebra I (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Algebra I is a clear presentation of algebra for the high school student. Topics include: Equations and Functions, Real Numbers, Equations of Lines, Graphs of Equations and Functions, Writing Linear Equations, Linear Inequalities, Solutions Using the Discriminant, Solving Systems of Equations and Inequalities, Exponential Functions, Polynomials, Quadratic Equations and Functions, Algebra and Geometry Connections, Rational Equations and Functions, and Probability and Statistics

Algebra Foundations (2 Semesters)

This course prepares students for Algebra 1 by introducing them to variables, algebraic expressions, equations, functions, inequalities, and their graphical representation. The students develop the ability to explore and solve mathematical problems, think critically, work cooperatively and communicate mathematical ideas clearly.

Algebra II (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Algebra II expands upon equations and functions, with a focus on solving and simplifying complex algebraic expressions. Key Concepts: Equations & inequalities; linear equations & functions; systems of linear equations & inequalities; matrices; quadratic functions; polynomial functions; roots, radicals, & function operations; exponential & logarithmic functions; trigonometry; introduction to probability; sequences & series; conic sections; rational functions.

Honors Algebra I (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Honors Algebra 1 is a foundational course for the college-bound student. In this yearlong course, students will learn to read, define, and apply algebraic concepts. Topics include Equations and Inequalities, Functions, Extension of Linear Concepts, Exponents, Radicals and Polynomials, Quadratic Functions, and Probability and Statistics.

Geometry (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Geometry connects algebraic concepts to geometric relationships related to the characteristics of shapes. Key Concepts: Basics of geometry including lines, distance, & angles; reasoning & proof; parallel & perpendicular lines; triangles & congruence; relationships with triangles; polygons & quadrilaterals; ratios & proportions; right triangle trigonometry; circles; perimeter & area; surface & area volume; symmetry, reflections & rigid transformations.

Honors Algebra II (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Honors Algebra 2 is an extension of skills and concepts learned in Algebra 1 Honors. The goal of the course is to prepare students for successful completion of precalculus. This second semester of this course covers an introduction to trigonometry. Topics include functions, radical functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, geometry, conic sections, systems of equations, trigonometric graphs, identities and equations, and trigonometric ratios and functions.

Precalculus (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. Scaffolding rigorous content with clear instruction, the course leads students through an advanced study of trigonometric functions, matrices, and vectors. Key Concepts: Functions & graphs; polynomials; rational functions; logs & exponents; trigonometry; vectors; systems & matrices; conics; polar & parametric equations; probability & statistics.

Honors Geometry (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Geometry (Honors) builds on concepts learned in Algebra 1 and developed an in-depth understanding of Geometric concepts, theorems, and postulates through the use of proofs and the application of trigonometry. Coursework emphasizes proofs and application of skills learned in Algebra 1 (Honors) as preparation for advanced math courses through Precalculus. Students apply algebraic principles and formulate proofs utilizing the following concepts: parallel and perpendicular lines, the coordinate plane, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, congruence and similarity, surface area, volume, and transformations.

Integrated Math I (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Integrated Math I is the first course of a three-course sequence that satisfies the California Common Core Standards. Integrated Math I builds and strengthens students’ conceptual knowledge of Algebra and Geometry. Key Concepts: Functions; equations; inequalities; systems of linear equations & inequalities; one variable descriptive statistics; correlation & residuals; analyzing categorical data; mathematical modeling; coordinate & transformational geometries.

AP Calculus AB (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

The overall goal of this course is to help students understand and apply the three big ideas of AB Calculus: limits, derivatives, and integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Embedded throughout the big ideas are the mathematical practices for AP Calculus: reasoning with definitions and theorems, connecting concepts, implementing algebraic/computational processes, connecting multiple representations, building notational fluency, and communicating mathematics orally and in well-written sentences. Applications, in particular to solid geometry and physics, will be studied where appropriate.

Integrated Math II (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Integrated Math II is the second course of a three-course sequence that satisfies the California Common Core Standards. Integrated Math II builds and strengthens students’ conceptual knowledge of complex algebraic and geometric relationships. Key Concepts: Triangular relationships; similarity; polygons; circles; areas; volumes; right triangle trigonometry; functions; imaginary numbers; higher order polynomials; graphing of functions; irrational expressions; probability & statistics.

AP Statistics (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

The AP Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling, and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding.

Integrated Math III (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Integrated Math III is the third course of a three course sequence that satisfies the California Common Core Standards. This course utilizes a problem-centered approach to advanced relationships across Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and Statistics. Key Concepts: Graphs; functions; geometry & trigonometry analysis; polar coordinates; vectors; equations & inequalities; sequences; the Binomial Theorem; probability & statistics.

SCIENCE

Biology (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Biology introduces students to the study of living organisms and their environment, engaging them to connect their learnings to everyday life. Students will investigate the roles and dependencies of organisms within populations, communities, ecosystems, and the biosphere. Key Concepts: Introduction to the scientific method; cytology; genetics; botany; zoology; ecology; taxonomy; evolution; chemistry; microbiology.

Physical Science (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Physical Science introduces scientific investigation and the scope of physical science. This course will explain how scientific investigation is performed, as well as how technology and science go hand-in-hand. Key Concepts: The world of science; matter; atoms; periodic table; chemical bonding & reactions; chemistry of carbon; Newton’s Laws of Motion; forces; work & machines; energy; waves; sound; electromagnetic radiation; visible light; electricity.
*This class is UC a-g approved as the elective (g) category only.

Engineering (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Engineering helps students understand what engineers do, as well as the processes and skills required. Throughout the duration of the course, students will work in an Engineering lab onsite twice a week for hands-on application in engineering projects. Key Concepts: Engineering techniques and practices; engineering careers; engineering in society; engineering design process; math in engineering; history of engineering; problem-solving with engineering (graphing, programming, loops, & conditionals).

AP Environmental Science (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, and to evaluate the risks associated with these problems and examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.
*This class is UC a-g approved as the elective (g) category only.

Earth Science (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Earth Science introduces scientific investigations and methods, observations, tools, and methods used for understanding Earth and its characteristics in the atmosphere, on land, and in water. Key Concepts: Principles of science, earth science tools, materials of the earth’s crust; plate tectonics; geological activity; surface processes & landforms; water; atmospheric processes; life on earth; earth’s history; natural resources; the solar system & beyond.
*This class is UC a-g approved as the elective (g) category only.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

U.S. History (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

U.S. History provides a comprehensive overview of the history of the United States, surveying the major events and turning points of U.S. history as it moves from the America’s cultural roots through modern times. Key Concepts: Foundations of U.S. democracy; territorial expansion; nationalism & sectionalism; religion & reform; manifest destiny; the Civil War; industrialization; Progressive era; The Great Depression; World War II; Civil Rights Movement; post-World War II.

AP U.S. History (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Coming soon...

World History (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

World History examines human development from the dawn of civilization to the present day. Using primary and secondary sources, students conduct an inquiry- based research to examine historical events, cultural developments, and social structures. Key Concepts: Early civilization; regional civilizations; The Renaissance & early modern times; The Enlightenment; industrialism & a new global age; world wars & revolution; the world since 1945.

AP World History (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

World History requires the development of thinking skills using the processes and tools that historians employ in order to create historical narrative. Students will also be required to think on many different geographical and temporal scales in order to compare historical events over time and space. AP World History is structured around the investigation of five themes woven into 19 key concepts covering six distinct chronological periods. History is a sophisticated quest for meaning about the past, beyond the effort to collect and memorize information.

American Government (UC/NCAA/1 Semester)

American Government provides students with an understanding of civic life, politics, and government, along with a short history of the American government’s foundation and development. Key Concepts: Foundations of American government; political behavior; legislative, executive, & judicial branches; comparative political & economic systems; powers & procedures of national, state, tribal, & local governments.

AP Macroeconomics (UC/1 Semesters)

AP Macroeconomics is a one-semester, college-level course. AP Macroeconomics emphasizes economic principles as applied to the economy as a whole. Topics discussed will reflect the material included in the booklet AP Economics Course Description from the College Board.
*This class is UC a-g approved as the elective (g) category only.

Economics (UC/NCAA/1 Semester)

Economics introduces students to the basics of economic principles and economic systems within the context of today’s economy. Key Concepts: Basics of economics; supply & demand; production technology & costs; monopoly, price discrimination, market entry, monopolistic competition, & oligopoly; external benefits & costs; labor market & distribution of income; money & banking systems.

AP Microeconomics (UC/1 Semester)

AP  Macroeconomics is a one-semester, college-level course. AP Macroeconomics emphasizes economic principles as applied to the economy as a whole. Topics discussed will reflect the material included in the booklet AP Economics Course Description from the College Board. 

*This class is UC a-g approved as the elective (g) category only.

Honors U.S. History (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

In this Honors U.S. History course, the focus is on an in-depth analysis of major turning points in American History and how philosophies, events, policies and people have helped shape the America we live in today. The twentieth century is the period highlighted for analysis but in order to truly analyze that time period, the students must first review the foundations of the nation and trace the changes over time.

AP American Government (UC/NCAA/1 Semesters)

This AP U.S. Government and Politics class is a one-semester course. It introduces students to the Foundations of American Democracy. Emphasis is placed on the Interactions Among Branches of Government and Civil Liberties and Civil Rights. Students also spend time learning about the importance of political participation.

WORLD LANGUAGE

Spanish I (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Spanish I is an introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish, as well as the cultural influences of Spanish and Latino heritage at home and abroad. Key Concepts: Introductions; descriptions; school; food; hobbies; families; home; shopping; expressions; cultural comparisons; adjectives.

French I (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

French I focuses on basic skills for listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French. Each lesson introduces new vocabulary and grammar concepts through various comprehension activities. Key Concepts: Vocab includes introductions, dates, personal & family life, city life, & time; present-tense verbs & grammar.

Spanish II (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Spanish II continues language development skills for comprehension, reading, and writing using cultural presentations and interactive activities that reinforce common grammar patterns. Key Concepts: Special events; community; TV; news; cooking; affirmative & negative commands; common & irregular verb tenses.

French II (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

French II uses authentic cultural resources, such as movies and songs, to expand reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills so students can communicate effectively in French. Key Concepts: Vocab includes greetings, family, friends, hobbies, shopping, food, travel, & restaurants; complex verb & grammar.

Spanish III (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Spanish III equips students to interact verbally and in writing in varied social and business situations through discussion and analysis of complex topics using irregular grammar structures. Key Concepts: Vocab includes special events, Spanish art & literature; complex grammar (e.g., preterite, imperfect, subjunctive); commands; pronouns.

French III (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

French III focuses on four modes of expression in French, including: listening, speaking, writing and reading. The main goal of this course is for students to develop receptive and productive skills that will allow them to communicate efficiently in French. Key Concepts: Vocab includes personal relationships, friendships, family life, city and city life, hotels, places to stay, health, media, & careers; complex verbs & grammar.

Spanish IV (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

Students will build on their Spanish knowledge by learning more complex grammatical structures and become equipped to read and understand a variety of literary selections. Key Concepts: Vocab includes art, self-expression, relationships, & careers; complex verb tenses & grammar (e.g., preterite, imperfect, subjunctive).

French IV (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

French IV reinforces the skills and linguistic tools learned in previous French courses. Students will develop receptive and productive skills that will allow them to communicate extensively in French and understand the language through cultural experiences. Key Concepts: Vocab includes science & technology, family & communities, medical care, the arts, & the outdoors; complex verbs & grammar.

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS

Art Appreciation (UC/2 Semesters)

Art Appreciation is an art survey course designed to increase knowledge and appreciation of the visual arts. Students focus on interpreting and evaluating works of art within formal, cultural, and historical contexts, including a deep look at global artwork. Key Concepts: Elements of art; principles of design; art making; art in early civilizations; early Christian to Gothic art; renaissance to Rococo; early modernism; exploring world art; art careers.

Music Appreciation (UC/2 Semesters)

Music Appreciation is an introductory course to music’s various functionalities. Throughout the course, students apply their understanding through music composition to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for all types of music. Key Concepts: Music literacy; musical instruments; sacred music; music for stage, screen, beat, & rhythm; music for social entertainment; vocals; music genres; media & Western, romantic & 20th century classical music.

ELECTIVES/CAREER EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY (CTE)

Advanced Business (2 Semesters)

This course provides students with a comprehensive study of the topics and skills required to succeed as leaders in business, entrepreneurship, and life. Students will build upon the lessons and skills learned in the Entrepreneurship Course. Topics in this course include advanced accounting, advanced marketing, advertising, business law, human resource management, international business, professional communications, public speaking, and marketing practices.

Introduction to Teaching (1 Semester)

This course focuses on teaching as a profession, along with the use of technology in education. Students will explore the qualities of an effective teacher, components and purposes of an effective professional portfolio, and critical issues in diverse contemporary classrooms. The course is designed to prepare future teachers with an understanding of how to utilize computers in the educational environment.

AP Psychology (UC/NCAA/2 Semesters)

This course in AP Psychology prepares students for the AP Psychology exam. The course begins with the study of the history and approaches of study in psychology. It provides students with a solid foundation of research methods in psychological science. The course will cover the biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, and states of consciousness.

Marketing 1 (UC/2 Semesters)

Students learn the foundations of functions needed to successfully market goods, services, and ideas to consumers. Professional development, customer service, and social media are presented as keys to students' success. While students study business, economics, selling, human relations, communications, logistics, promotion, product planning, and pricing. They also see marketing as a career choice.

Computer Literacy (UC/1 Semesters)

Computer Literacy is the study of how computers work. Computer system design and electronic/logic design are studied with the aim of providing a mental picture of how data is treated by a computer. Computer maintenance and repair are integral parts of this course.

Marketing 2 (UC/2 Semesters)

In this course, students will investigate, evaluate and create various marketing and communication strategies for the internet. Emphasis is placed on critical evaluation and website planning, development, design and creating content for effective online marketing campaigns.

Psychology (UC/1 Semester)

Psychology focuses on individual behavior and why an individual thinks, feels, and reacts to certain stimuli. Emphasis will be placed on research methods, how the brain works, altered states of consciousness, and psychological disorders. Key Concepts: Introduction to psychology; intelligence & learning; sleeping & dreaming; developmental psychology; stages of childhood & adolescence; nature vs. nurture; personality theory; psychological disorders.

Personal Finance (UC/1 Semester)

Personal Finance provides students with basic financial tools and knowledge that will enable them to build the lives they envision. The course will help students to understand how to plan for the future by planning for today. Key Concepts: American credit industry; stock market; consumerism; saving & budgeting; credit & debit; financial planning & insurance; investing & retirement; social security benefits; income, taxes, & giving; goal setting.

Early Childhood Education (UC/2 Semesters)

This course is designed to prepare students for work in a variety of instructional areas that involve working with children including preschool/daycare and primary grades. This course will focus on the areas of physical, cognitive and social-emotional child development from birth to age nine. Students will learn and apply theoretical knowledge and developmentally appropriate practices in the classroom.

Study Skills (2 Semesters)

This course is designed to strengthen general study skills for the high school in order to better prepare them for the rigor of high school courses. The course covers topics from time management to taking notes and can help students develop the study skills to be successful in high school and beyond.

Entrepreneurship (UC/2 Semesters)

Entrepreneurship is an interdisciplinary course designed to teach students how to start-up and operate a business while in school. The course integrates inquiry-based learning and business tools that enable students to analyze, create, develop and pilot small businesses in a safe campus environment. Key Concepts: Entrepreneurship; entrepreneur roles in society; types of businesses and ownership; business planning; marketing & sales; managing finances; obtaining investment.

Sustainable Energy & Renewable Technology (2 Semesters)

Coming soon...

Environmental Science (UC/2 Semesters)

Coming soon.

Web Design (UC/1 Semester)

Web Design teaches methods, theories, and principles of design through web design projects that help students develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills, artistic perception, critique and self-reflection. All experiences will be project-based, culminating in the development of their own website. Key Concepts: HTML, CSS, & JavaScript; color & contrast; elements of design including line, space, uniformity, repetition, contrast, alignment, & proximity; typography.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH

Physical Education 1 (2 Semesters)

Physical Education I focuses on the principles of fitness, including competency in motor skills and movement. Students enrolled in this course are required to complete 36 hours of physical activity that are signed off by an approved fitness professional. Key Concepts: Principles of fitness including balance, agility, coordination, power, & speed; consumer fitness products; occupational fitness requirements; disease prevention; designing a fitness program; evaluating fitness program elements.

Health

This high school Health course helps students develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy decisions that allow them to stay active, safe, and informed. Students learn about the components of a healthy lifestyle and learn strategies for making healthy choices. Instructional material introduces students to the concepts of mental health, emotional health, social health, consumer health, and physical health. It presents opportunities for students to apply their value systems to decisions concerning their own health. Students develop communication skills in this one-semester course that allow them to demonstrate healthy choices with respect for self, family, and others.

Physical Education 2 (2 Semesters)

Physical Education II focuses on the principles of fitness, including competency in motor skills and movement. Students enrolled in this course are required to complete 36 hours of physical activity that are signed off by an approved fitness professional. Key Concepts: Principles of fitness including balance, agility, coordination, power, & speed; consumer fitness products; occupational fitness requirements; disease prevention; designing a fitness program; evaluating fitness program elements.

K-8 COURSES

Language Arts (Kindergarten)

In this course, students receive structured lessons on readiness skills through emphasis on phonics, language skills, literature, and handwriting to help develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading.

Math (Kindergarten)

The course introduces Kindergarten students to numbers through 30. Students learn through reading, writing, counting, comparing, ordering, adding, and subtracting. They experience problem-solving and encounter early concepts in place value, time, length, weight, and capacity. They learn to gather and display simple data. Students also study two- and three-dimensional figures, identify, sort, study patterns, and relate mathematical figures to objects within their environment.

Science (Kindergarten)

Kindergarten students begin to develop observation skills as they learn about the five senses, the earth’s composition, and the basic needs of plants and animals.

Social Studies (Kindergarten)

The kindergarten History program teaches basics of world geography with the seven continents. 

Language Arts (First Grade)

In this course, students receive structured lessons on readiness skills through emphasis on phonics, language skills, literature, and handwriting to help develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading.

Math (First Grade)

This course for students in Grade 1 extends their work with place value to numbers through 100, emphasizing fluency of addition and subtraction facts, and focusing on number sentences and problem-solving with addition and subtraction. Students begin work with money, telling time, ordering events, and measuring length, weight, and capacity with non-standard units. Students identify attributes of geometric figures and also extend their work with patterns and data, including representing and comparing data.

Science (First Grade)

Students learn to perform experiments and record observations and understand how scientists see the natural world. They germinate seeds to observe plant growth and make a weathervane. 

Social Studies (First Grade)

This course kicks off a program that, spanning the elementary grades, provides an overview of world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age.

Language Arts (Second Grade)

This course provides a comprehensive and interrelated sequence of lessons for students to continue building their proficiency in literature and comprehension, writing skills, vocabulary, spelling, and handwriting.

Math (Second Grade)

This course for students in Grade 2 focuses primarily on number concepts, place value, and addition and subtraction of numbers through 1,000. Special emphasis is given to problem-solving, inverse operations, properties of operations, decomposition of numbers, and mental math. Students study money, time, and measurement; geometric figures; analyzing and displaying data with new representations; and determining the range and mode of data. Early concepts about multiplication, division, and fractions are introduced.

Science (Second Grade)

Students perform experiments to develop skills of observation and analysis and learn how scientists understand the world. They demonstrate how pulleys lift heavy objects, make a temporary magnet and test its strength, and analyze the parts of a flower.

Social Studies (Second Grade)

It's time to explore ancient Rome and meet Julius Caesar. Students will learn about the beginnings of Christianity during the Roman Empire, hear stories of the raiding and trading Vikings, appreciate the achievements of early Islamic civilization. During the early Middle Ages in Europe, meet knights in armor, and hear stories of St. George, Robin Hood, and Joan of Arc Students will visit the medieval African kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, and Songhai. You will travel the Silk Road across China, and meet the powerful emperor, Kublai Khan, and learn about the fighting samurai and the growth of Buddhism and Shintoism in feudal Japan.

Language Arts (Third Grade)

In this course, students receive structured lessons in the language arts, a discipline that includes literature and comprehension, writing skills, vocabulary, spelling, and handwriting. The purpose of these lessons is to increase reading comprehension, develop fundamental skills in oral and written communication, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.

Math (Third Grade)

The courses address geometry and measurement through introductory work on the perimeter, area, and attributes of two-dimensional geometric figures, and applying measuring techniques to solving problems involving time, length, capacity, and mass. Throughout the course, problem-solving connects individual mathematical skills and concepts in a useful and in-depth way. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.

Science (Third Grade)

Students learn to observe and analyze through hands-on experiments and gain further insight into how scientists understand our world. They observe and chart the phases of the moon, determine the properties of insulators and conductors, and make a three-dimensional model of a bone. 

Social Studies (Third Grade)

Students will explore the Renaissance, and meet Petrarch, da Vinci, Michelangelo, Gutenberg, Galileo, and more. Journey through the Age of Exploration with Dias, da Gama, Magellan and get to know the Maya, Aztecs, and Incas. Students will "visit" civilizations in India, Africa, China, and Japan. During England's Golden Age, meet Elizabeth I, Sir Walter Raleigh, and William Shakespeare, explore Jamestown, Plymouth, and the thirteen colonies in Colonial America and learn about the American Revolution.

Language Arts (Fourth Grade)

This is a comprehensive course covering reading comprehension, critical reading and analysis, composition, vocabulary, grammar, usage, and mechanics, including sentence analysis and diagramming. Structured lessons on spelling enable students to recognize base words and roots in related words. Lessons are designed to develop reading comprehension, build vocabulary, and help students become more independent readers. The emphasis is on classic literature. Additionally, students read works of nonfiction, as well as four novels selected from a long list of classic titles. Students will also practice the skills and question types they will find on many standardized tests.

Math (Fourth Grade)

The course enhances the fluency of operations through application in the solving of measurement, geometry, and data analysis problems using mathematical problem-solving techniques. Students make connections between fraction and decimal representation of numbers. Students study equivalences and relationships between fractions and decimals on the number line and with other models. Students develop algebraic thinking as they work with variables and formulas to solve multistep word problems and as they study patterns and rules. They extend their knowledge of geometry through a more in-depth classification of shapes and work with lines, angles, and rotations and the connection of geometric concepts to measurement and problem-solving. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.

Science (Fourth Grade)

Students develop scientific reasoning and perform hands-on experiments in Earth, Life, and Physical Sciences. They construct an electromagnet, identify minerals according to their properties, use chromatography to separate liquids, and assemble food webs. 

Social Studies (Fourth Grade)

Students learn the story of their home state, unique in American history in terms of its vast and varied geography, its many waves of immigration beginning with pre- Columbian societies, its continuous diversity, economic energy, and rapid growth. In addition to the specific treatment of milestones in California history, students examine the state in the context of the rest of the nation, with an emphasis on the U.S. Constitu­tion and the relationship between state and federal government.

Language Arts (Fifth Grade)

This course provides structured lessons on reading comprehension, critical reading and analysis, composition, vocabulary, grammar, usage, and mechanics. Through an emphasis on spelling, students learn relationships between sounds and spellings in words and affixes. Lessons are designed to develop comprehension, hone critical reading skills, build vocabulary, and help students evaluate and apply the ideas they have learned from their reading. Students practice writing as they write a memoir, an editorial, a research paper, a business letter, and more. Students learn about parts of speech, punctuation, and research skills. Students study literature in a variety of genres including fiction, poetry, nonfiction, drama, and novels. Students also learn to work with technology and multimedia through the short and extended projects they complete.

Math (Fifth Grade)

The course enhances the fluency of operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals through application in the solving of measurement, geometry, and data-analysis problems using mathematical problem-solving techniques. Students continue to develop algebraic thinking as they work with variables and formulas to solve multistep word problems; they further study patterns and rules, and they are introduced to representing problems graphically using the coordinate plane. They extend their knowledge of geometry through the use of the classification of shapes into hierarchies based on their attributes, the introduction of three-dimensional figures and volume, and the connection of geometric concepts to measurement and problem-solving. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.

Science (Fifth Grade)

In this course, students will learn water Resources, the world's ocean, earth's atmosphere, fore of motion, chemistry, cells and cell processes, the taxonomy of plants and animals, animal physiology.

Social Studies (Fifth Grade)

This course takes students from the arrival of the first people in North America through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Lessons integrate topics in geography, civics, and economics. Building on the award-winning series A History of US, the course guides students through critical episodes in the story of America. Students investigate Native American civilizations; follow the path of European exploration and colonization; assess the causes and consequences of the American Revolution; examine the Constitution and the growth of the new nation; and analyze what led to the Civil War and its aftermath.

Language Arts (Sixth Grade)

Students read and analyze a variety of informational and fictional texts. Instruction and reading strategies accompany reading selections to help engage students in the text and sharpening their comprehension. Students express their ideas and knowledge using standard (formal) English in written and oral assignments. Writing expressive, analytical, and procedural compositions helps students develop communication skills necessary in today's world. Vocabulary is taught explicitly and through an array of vocabulary acquisition strategies that give students the tools to independently increase their vocabulary. Students study grammar, usage, and mechanics; and practice sentence analysis, sentence structure, and proper punctuation.

Math (Sixth Grade)

Students enhance computational and problem-solving skills while learning topics in algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics. They solve expressions and equations in the context of the perimeter, area, and volume problems, and to develop computational skills with fractions and decimals. The study of plane and solid figures include construction and transformations of figures. Also in the context of problem-solving, students add, subtract, multiply, and divide positive and negative integers, and solve problems involving ratios, proportions, and percents, including simple and compound interest, rates, discount, tax, and tip problems.

Science (Sixth Grade)

Builds on the natural curiosity of students. By connecting them to the beauty of geological history, the amazing landforms around the globe, the nature of the sea and air, and the newest discoveries about our universe, the curriculum gives students an opportunity to relate to their everyday world. Students will explore topics such as the fundamentals of geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy; Earth's minerals and rocks; Earth's interior; plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, and the movements of continents; geology and the fossil record; the oceans and the atmosphere; and the solar system and the universe.

Social Studies (Sixth Grade)

Students in grade six expand their understanding of history by studying the people and events that ushered in the dawn of the major Western and non-Western ancient civiliza­tions. Geography is of special significance in the development of the human story. Continued emphasis is placed on the everyday lives, problems, and accomplishments of people, their role in developing social, economic, and political structures, as well as in establishing and spreading ideas that helped transform the world forever. Students develop higher levels of critical thinking by considering why civilizations developed where and when they did, why they became dominant, and why they declined. Stu­dents analyze the interactions among various cultures, emphasizing their enduring contributions and the link, despite time, between the contemporary and ancient worlds.

Language Arts (Seventh Grade)

Students express themselves using standard (formal) English in written and oral presentations. Analyzing and practicing the form and structure of various genres of writing enhances students' communication skills. Students study a variety of media to understand informational and persuasive techniques, explicit and implied messages, and how visual and auditory cues affect messages. Grammar, usage, and mechanics skills are deepened. 

Math (Seventh Grade)

Students extend their understanding of ratios to develop an understanding of proportions and solve problems, including scale drawings, percent increase and decrease simple interest, and tax. They also extend their understanding of numbers and properties of operations to include rational numbers. Signed rational numbers are contextualized and students use rational numbers in constructing expressions and solving equations. Students derive formulas and solve two-dimensional area problems, including the area of composite figures. In three dimensions, students find the surface area using formulas and nets. Students also compute the volume of three-dimensional objects, including cubes and prisms. Students make use of sampling techniques to draw inferences about a population, including comparative inferences about two populations. Students also investigate chance processes through experimental and theoretical probability models.

Science (Seventh Grade)

Investigate the world of living things at levels both large and small by reading, observing, and experimenting with aspects of life on Earth. Students explore an amazing variety of organisms, the complex workings of the cell and cell biology, the relationship between living things and their environments, and discoveries in the world of modern genetics. Students tackle such topics as ecology, microorganisms, animals, plants, cells, animals, species, adaptation, heredity, genetics, and the history of life on Earth.

Social Studies (Seventh Grade)

The study of world history, landforms and geography, money and economics, the powers and parallels of political science, sociology, and anthropology in this two-semester course. Social Studies 7 begins with the mysteries of the ancient empires of the Americas, moves on to the fall of the Roman Empire and the rise of the Franks in Europe, and covers revolutionary Europe, the Industrial Revolution, nationalism and Imperialism, World Wars I and II, colonial India, the United Nations, the Vietnam War, past and current issues in the Middle East, and ancient and modern Africa.

Language Arts (Eighth Grade)

The course focuses on the interpretation of literary works, analysis of informational texts, and the development of oral and written communication skills in standard (formal) English. Students read between the lines to interpret literature and go beyond the text to discover how the culture in which a work of literature was created contributes to the theme and ideas it conveys. Analysis of the structure and elements of informational texts and media helps students develop the skills needed for academic success and the navigating the world.

Math (Eighth Grade)

Proportions are understood as special linear equations in which the constant of proportionality is the slope. Students also consider the fit of bivariate data with linear models. Students solve systems of two linear equations in two variables and relate those solutions to a representation in the coordinate plane. Functions are understood as a rule that determines a unique output for every input. Students apply functions and are able to translate between various representations. Geometry delves into translations, rotations, reflections, and dilations in the coordinate plane. Students also consider the angles created by the transversal of parallel lines. The Pythagorean Theorem is explored and used to find distances between points and to analyze polygons. Students also find volumes of cones, cylinders, and sphere.

Science (Eighth Grade)

The course provides an overview of the physical world and gives students tools and concepts to think clearly about matter, atoms, molecules, chemical reactions, motion, force, momentum, work and machines, energy, waves, electricity, light, and other aspects of chemistry and physics. Among other subjects, students study the structure of atoms; the elements and the Periodic Table; chemical reactions; forces, including gravitational, motion, acceleration, and mass; and energy, including light, thermal, electricity, and magnetism.

Social Studies (Eighth Grade)

Beginning with the world as it was in the 1500s. Periods and events covered in Social Studies 8 include the exploration of the New World, the establishment of the American colonies, the colonial era leading up the French and Indian War, the Revolutionary War, the development of American government, the War of 1812, the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark exploration, Manifest Destiny, and the Mexican War. Students also explore immigration and abolition issues, the Civil War and Reconstruction, westward expansion, the development of the United States as a world power, World War I, the 1920s, the Great Depression, and World War II.